BIBLIOGRAPHY 1907

1906
Master List
1908
PUBLISHING

Sir Richard Losely and Lobangu are introduced by Cecil Hayter. As Blake's friends and allies, they would appear in many adventures over the years ... including some in which they take center-stage, without Sexton Blake.
PENNY PICTORIAL begins featuring short Sexton Blake tales nearly all of which are thought to have been written by the aforementioned Hayter.
Arthur Steffens aka Arthur S. Hardy begins his tenure as a Sexton Blake author. Born in 1873, he spent his early years as an actor-manager; he was also a committed sports enthusiast and a brilliant billiards player. A. S. Hardy, as he was more usually known, dropped out of writing in the early 1930s and died in 1939.
BLAKE TRIVIA

THE SLAVE MARKET reveals that a very young Blake went to school at St. Ermin's. This was probably his first school (junior), before he moved to the Public School of Ashleigh. In THE MISSING MILLIONAIRE, Blake says he went to school in Winchester so one or possibly both of these schools must be in that cathedral city.
By far the most important event reported this year is Blake's encounter with his long-lost elder brother, Henry. Henry Blake is decribed as being much older than his brother. We are told that he is just over 35 years old ("It is more than twenty years ago now ... and I was then fifteen."). From this we can estimate that Sexton Blake is probably somewhere in his twenties when this meeting occurs.
Henry notes that Sexton does not remember his parents who were good, if rather stuffy, people. Neither did he have much memory of his sibling who, when his father accused him of stealing money, had left home never to return. It is also claimed that Sexton Blake has no other relation in the world besides Henry. This becomes problematical in 1933 when, in the first issue of DETECTIVE WEEKLY, a similar story to this one was published. In SEXTON BLAKE'S SECRET, Nigel Blake is introduced — another wayward brother — but this time younger than Sexton. We can only deduce that Nigel was born after Henry had left and that the eldest Blake is unaware of his youngest brother's existence.
A combination of the stress caused by Henry's appearance together with extensive travels in Africa (which included serious bouts of fever) seem to take their toll; in the PENNY PICTORIAL stories the detective is advised to rest by 'his doctors' (note the plural) and retires to a house in Aston Villa, Surbiton and, later, to lodgings in Messenger Square. Tinker remains at Baker Street, taking care of business there. During this absence from his regular consultancy, Blake takes on numerous fairly light cases and is often assisted by a friend referred to only as Bathurst or by Lady Molly, a young woman who, as his understudy, becomes a talented detective in her own right. These quick cases took six years to publish but must have actually occurred over a period of three or four months (at most) this year. While that appears extraordinary, many of these stories only take a few hours of the detective's time, so it's not as impossible as it might seem.

ISSUES
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 294 · 22/1/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 1)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); Brave Bess by Beverley Kent; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis; The Longbows at Stourbridge fair by Morton Pike; The School Against Him by Henry St. John; Harry Brandon, Actor by Atherley Daunt; The Three Emigrants by Gordon Carr.
Notes: This series was inspired by the reports that started coming out of the Congo four years previous to its publication. In 1908, Leopold II of Belgium was forced to make reforms. From the Editor's Den: "In this new story Sexton Blake takes up the mission of an envoy to discover the truth concerning the atrocities in this black spot of Africa — atrocities which have shocked the feelings of the whole civilised world. If the revolting story of brutality and crime in the Congo is true, then the King of the Belgians is the greatest and most appalling criminal in history. If it is untrue — and time alone will prove — then there has been a shockingly gross miscarriage of facts."
Part one of the series begins with Sexton Blake having an audience with King Edward. The monarch has a mission for the detective: to go to Africa to see whether the reports coming out of the Congo region are true. Blake gladly accepts and, with Tinker and Pedro, sets sail. 200 miles up the Congo, disaster strikes when they lose all their supplies, including weapons. While pondering a grim-looking future, they stumble upon an injured Belgian who turns out to be Professor Paul Vandervelde, an old friend of Blake's. When Vandervelde dies, Blake takes his identity, supplies and his travel permits. Setting off in search of a missionary called Robert Ferguson, the team encounter Belgian soldiers attacking a native village and are captured. Here the narrative is inturrupted by true reports giving vivid accounts of real massacres similar to that which Blake witnesses. The detective, Tinker and Pedro are taken to the soldiers' leader, Major Van Bruggen, who Blake recognises as a villain he once crossed paths with. When the Major orders the death of a native, Saadani, Blake buys the man's life.
Trivia: From the editorial: "So popular has the character of Sexton Blake become, that very shortly a sketch, based on one of his adventures, will be played in some of the most polular halls of entertainment in the country."
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 295 · 29/1/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 2)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); Brave Bess by Beverley Kent; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis; A Duel on the Footplate by J. L. Beeston; The School Against Him by Henry St. John; Harry Brandon, Actor by Atherley Daunt; The Three Emigrants by Gordon Carr.
Notes: In part two, Tinker learns that Major van Bruggen suspects that 'Paul Vandervelde' isn't all he seems and has sent for a man who knew the professor. The Belgians are also awaiting a force of 'Zappo-Zap' cannibals — their allies — before launching an attack on a neighbouring village ('Zappo-Zap' may sound like a made-up name but it isn't. The tribe is genuine, has a recorded history of cannibalism, and worked for the Belgians during Leopold's bloody rule). For Blake, Tinker, Pedro and Saadani, escape is imperative.
Trivia: Further details of a Sexton Blake sketch are given in this issue's editorial: "To show how popular Sexton Blake is at this time, I may inform my friends that this famous character has been dramatised in a sketch by the Carlotta de Yonson Sketch Company. The cast of the piece is as follows:
CAST OF PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS:
C. Douglas Carlile as Sexton Blake
Charles A. Carlile as The Master Criminal
M. Langdale as Makeroff
C. Williams as Baker
W. Louper as Silas Strong
Lee Gilbert as Tinker
and Carlotta de Yonson as Leah Sowcell
Scene I. The Reception-room, Homer House.
Scene II. Blake's Study, Baker Street.
Scene III. Office of Howton, Carter, Brown & Co., Westminster.
The sketch will be first seen in London at the Surrey Theatre, at Mile End on January 28th, and on February 4th will appear at the Prince's Theatre, Hoxton, and at several other places of variety entertainment in London. After that it will tour in the provinces."

Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 296 · 5/2/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 3)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); Brave Bess by Beverley Kent; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis; The Longbows to the Rescue by Morton Pike; The School Against Him by Henry St. John; Harry Brandon, Actor by Atherley Daunt; The Three Emigrants by Gordon Carr.
Notes: Blake and friends escape from van Bruggen and foil his attack on a neighbouring village. The Zappo-Zaps flee and Blake gives the Major a sound thrashing. The detective and his team then continue their journey to missionary Ferguson's compound. They are greeted by him, his wife and young daughter, and by his faithful companion, a giant Zulu warrior called Shumpogaas. The latter warns that Zappo-Zaps are gathering for an attack.
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 297 · 12/2/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 4)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); Brave Bess by Beverley Kent; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis; The Bushranger's of Black Gap by John Finnemore; The School Against Him by Henry St. John; Harry Brandon, Actor by Atherley Daunt; The Three Emigrants by Gordon Carr.
Notes: Shumpogaas fights, and wins, a duel with one of the Zappo-Zap cannibals. The Zappo-Zaps lay seige to the compound and manage to kidnap Ferguson's daughter, Sheila. Tinker sets off on a solo mission to save her.
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 298 · 19/2/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 5)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); Brave Bess by Beverley Kent; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis; The Biters Bit by Max Hamilton; The School Against Him by Henry St. John; Harry Brandon, Actor by Atherley Daunt; Jack Simon's Revenge by Clement Hale; The Three Emigrants by Gordon Carr.
Notes: Tinker rescues Shiela Ferguson and returns with her to the missionary compound. The defenders manage to fight off the attacking Zappo-Zaps who, with Major van Bruggen, appear to retreat. Ferguson and his family take safe passage to the coast while Blake's party heads for the Abir district where further atrocities have been reported. Shumpogaas elects to join with Blake after first accompanying Ferguson to the river. But Zappo-Zaps follow the detective and set fire to the forest behind him. The wind sends the flames racing towards him.
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 299 · 26/2/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 6)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); Brave Bess by Beverley Kent; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis; The School Against Him by Henry St. John; How Dick Fed the Village by John Finnemorer; The Three Emigrants by Gordon Carr.
Notes: Sexton Blake, Tinker, Pedro and Saadani flee before the advancing flames. They reach a river and take refuge on a floating log while fear-maddened wild animals plunge into the water around them. Crocodiles attack and cause carnage. Eventually the log begins to float downstream, taking Blake and co. away from the danger. They meet up with Shumpogaas but are followed by a group of Zappo-Zaps and a young, unidentified Belgian officer. A battle ensues and the cannibals are defeated. Blake saves the officer's life before departing with his comrades, leaving the enemies behind.
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 300 · 5/3/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 7)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); Among the Shawnees by Unknown; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis; The School Against Him by Henry St. John; The Hunted Hundred by Morton Pike; The Three Emigrants by Gordon Carr.
Notes: This issue's editorial contains a report from the Congo detailing the arrest of a Belgian officer for acts of cruelty. "It is confirmation," writes the Editor, "that the story of Sexton Blake on the Congo is absolutely founded on fact."
Our heroes leave the river and begin to journey inland. During the night, a gorilla enters their camp and engages in a terrific fight with Pedro who eventually escapes cut and bruised while the ape makes off (There are some interesting misconceptions expressed about the nature of gorillas during this passage — apparently they build nests in trees!). The travellers venture farther into the Ibir region and come upon villagers collecting rubber to pay their tax to the Belgian overseers. After rescuing one of them from a beating, Blake vows to lead the villagers to a hiding place in a great forest nearby.
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 301 · 12/3/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 8)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); Tales of the Prairie by Anon.; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis; The School Against Him by Henry St. John; The Day of Reckoning by Allan Blair; The Three Emigrants by Gordon Carr.
Notes: Blake leads the villagers towards safety but the journey isn't without its hazards. Tinker is attacked by a 9-foot long snake and dragged under water. Brave Shumpogaas rescues him ... but then faces a battle with an even bigger serpent. This beast guards the entrance to the Valley of Peace, the refugees' destination.
Trivia: From the editorial: 'DOES SEXTON BLAKE EXIST? Almost every day I receive letters from my chums asking me this question. It serves to show the great enthusiasm which the great detective has aroused in the minds of the readers of our new serial, "Sexton Blake in the Congo," as well as of our weekly complete novels which appear in "The Union Jack." Well, then, the great detective does exist, and very much so, as members of the criminal profession know to their cost. He is occasionally to be seen in his office, the whereabouts of which I am not permitted to disclose, other than to say that it is situated less than five miles from Charing Cross. Another thing I am not permitted to state is his name, for obvious reasons, he does not practice professionally under the name of Sexton Blake.'
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 302 · 19/3/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 2d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 9)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); The School Against Him by Henry St. John; In the Depths of the Tunnel by L. J. Beeston and G. M. Dodshon; Tales of the Prairie by Anon.; Every Inch a Scot by Allan Blair; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis; Livingstone's Baby by Clement Hale; The Longbows in London Town by Morton Pike; The Three Emigrants by Gordon Carr; The Golden Secret by David Goodwin.
Notes: Spring double issue. Shumpogaas fights and defeats the great serpent, though it's a close run thing. With Zappo-Zaps almost upon them, the villagers are led to safety by Tinker and Saadani while Blake guards the rear and Shumpogaas slips into the shelter of some reeds. The cannibals arrive and capture the detective, taking him back to Major van Bruggen. The Major calls for the Belgian officer who used to know Paul Vandervelde. This man turns out to be the Belgian who Blake had previously saved and he returns the favour by supporting Blake's masquerade. Unfortunately, later, the detective is stricken with fever and van Bruggen withholds the quinine that could relive the symptoms. Blake slips into a delirium and reveals his identity. Meanwhile, Tinker, Shumpogaas and Saadani set out to rescue him.
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 303 · 26/3/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 10)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); The School Against Him by Henry St. John; Tales of the Prairie by Anon.; The Three Emigrants by Gordon Carr; Every Inch a Scot by Allan Blair; The Mystery of Redmere Castle by 'A Popular Author'; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis.
Notes: From the editorial: 'I do not think that any story which I have published in THE BOYS' FRIEND has brought me more letters than the story of "Sexton Blake in the Congo," now appearing in our paper. Perhaps it is because this story is based upon actual facts. Every day the newspapers have something to say about the atrocities which are still being committed in this black spot in darkest Africa.'
Tinker, Shumpogaas and Saadani manage to rescue Blake and, joined by the Belgian officer — Captain Francotte — who had helped the detective, the party escapes back to the Valley of Peace. Here they rest up and recoup while Francotte gives the natives military training. Soon it is time for Blake to continue his travels. With Tinker, Pedro, Shumpogaas and Saadani in tow, he leaves the valley and journeys deeper into the Ibir region. Still feverish, the detective is dismayed when a crocodile attacks and destroys the pack containing the group's supply of quinine. Approaching the village of Ishogo, they are then set upon by a maddened elephant.
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 304 · 2/4/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 11)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); Tales of the Prairie by Anon.; The School Against Him by Henry St. John; The Mad Knights of Sherwood by Morton Pike; Every Inch a Scot by Allan Blair; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis.
Notes: From the editorial: "This tale still continues to awaken the most vivid interest, and I am constantly in receipt of extracts from newspapers sent to me by kindly-disposed friends, dealing with meetings which have been held to protest against the atrocities committed by the Belgian Government officials in the Congo Free State. All these are so much more proof of the truth of the statements which have appeared in our great story, "Sexton Blake in the Congo," and I would like my boys to draw the attention of their parents to the fact that this story is at present running in our pages. It is based upon actual personal experiences, and every incident which is dealt with in this story can be vouched for as fact. There is no doubt that the publication of this tale is doing something towards stirring up interest in one of the most disgraceful misusages of power by any civilised European government."
Blake manages to kill the wild elephant but is then stricken with fever. While he lies helpless in one of the huts, Tinker and the others help the villagers to collect their quota of rubber. Blake's condition worsens and soon he is in the grip of a profound delirium.
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 305 · 9/4/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 12)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); Tales of the Prairie by Anon.; The School Against Him by Henry St. John; Martin Gray — Engine Driver by L. J. Beeston; Every Inch a Scot by Allan Blair; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis.
Notes: Major van Bruggen arrives in Ishogo to collect the rubber tax. The natives manage to hide Sexton Blake's presence and the Belgian leaves, satisfied that they have filled their quota. As Blake's condition worsens, Shumpogaas sets off for a neighbouring village to fetch a famed wise woman. Tinker has no faith in local herbs, though, and so heads for the Belgian's camp to beg for Quinine. Disguised as a native and pretending to have a sick brother, he pleads with van Bruggen, who refuses to part with the medicine. Tinker steals it and escapes. Meanwhile, out of his mind with the fever, a delusional Blake slips out of Ishogo with Pedro at his side.
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 306 · 16/4/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 13)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); Tales of the Prairie by Anon.; The School Against Him by Henry St. John; Every Inch a Scot by Allan Blair; A Flight From Fortune by 'A Popular Author'; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis.
Notes: Sexton Blake, completely delirious, wanders aimlessly through the African jungle. He is beset by dangers at every turn and would be dead were it not for the faithful Pedro, who protects him from the wild beasts. Finally, he collapses in a clearing with the bloodhound and a lion bristling at each other over his body. Tinker, meanwhile, has escaped from the Belgians but has lost his way en route back to Ishogo. He wanders through the jungle until he eventually hears Pedro baying. Following the sound, he rushes into the clearing and shoots the lion dead. At this point, he discovers that the quinine bottle has broken and the medicine is lost. Almost despairing, he attaches a message to Pedro's collar and sends the hound to get help.
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 307 · 23/4/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 14)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); Tales of the Prairie by Anon.; The School Against Him by Henry St. John; The Longbows in Ireland by Morton Pike; Every Inch a Scot by Allan Blair; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis.
Notes: Shumpogaas's journey to find the wise woman is interrupted by a fight between a leopard and a buffalo. The Zulu intervenes, killing the leopard. This is witnessed by a club-wielding gorilla which slinks away after deciding that the human is too dangerous to fight. The buffalo flees, cutting the warrior with one of its horns as it passes. Shumpogaas continues his journey but is weakened by his wound. He gets lost and stumbles upon a village of pygmies. They dress his wound and guide him to the village where he finds the wise woman.
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 308 · 30/4/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 15)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); Tales of the Prairie by Anon.; The School Against Him by Henry St. John; Every Inch a Scot by Allan Blair; Harry Oswald's First Patient by Max Hamilton; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis.
Notes: Pedro reaches the villagers with Tinker's message attached to his collar. They race to Tinker and Blake's assistance. Shumpogaas arrives with the wise woman and her medicines work wonders; Blake's fever is broken and he begins to recover. Now the travellers gather together the villagers and they all begin the long trek to the Valley of Peace. But the Belgians aren't far behind and are soon shooting at the retreating party.
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 309 · 7/5/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 16)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); Tales of the Prairie by Anon.; The School Against Him by Henry St. John; Every Inch a Scot by Allan Blair; The Castle on the Marsh by Morton Pike; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis.
Notes: The Zappo-Zaps, led by Major van Bruggen, catch up with Blake's party and a battle breaks out. Fortunately, the pygmies Shumpogaas had met earlier come to the aid of our heroes. Nevertheless, the fighting is ferocious (and very bloody for a Blake tale) and it lasts for most of the length of this installment. Finally, though, the Zappo-Zaps retreat and the detective is able to lead the villagers away towards the Valley of Peace.
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 310 · 14/5/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 17)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); Tales of the Prairie by Anon.; The School Against Him by Henry St. John; Every Inch a Scot by Allan Blair; Dick Merriman R. N. by Max Hamilton; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis.
Notes: A few days have passed and Sexton Blake is fully recovered from his bout of fever. He, Tinker, Pedro, Saadani and Shumpogaas are travelling along a river on a raft. Shumpogaas begins to tell Blake about his past and the fact that he commanded 20,000 warriors during the Boer War. He recalls the time he faced a brave British soldier in hand-to-hand battle; a fight which, much to Shumpogaas's chagrine, ended inconclusively. His tale is interrupted when the raft hits some rocks, the rudder breaks, and the travellers find themselves helplessly drawn into dangerous rapids. The raft is destroyed and while Blake, Tinker and Shumpogaas make it to shore, there is no sign of Saadani or Pedro.
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 311 · 21/5/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 18)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); Tales of the Prairie by Anon.; The School Against Him by Henry St. John; Every Inch a Scot by Allan Blair; The Sheriff's Messenger by Morton Pike; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis.
Notes: Thankfully, Pedro and Saadani are discovered in good health further down the river. The travellers are now without supplies or weapons. After an exhausted sleep, they hear a shot in the distance and head towards it. They find a the body of a village chief; he has just been executed by Belgians who have now departed. At the village, Blake and co. are greeted by a kindly missionary. His assistant turns out to be the soldier Shumpogaas had fought during the Boer War. The two men start fighting but are pulled apart by the others and, seeing the error of their ways, they become friends. The missionary and villagers build Blake a new raft and provide him with supplies and weapons. But before he can continue his journey, a woman arrives at the village pleading for help.
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 312 · 28/5/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 19)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Your Editor's Den (ed.); Tales of the Prairie by Anon.; The School Against Him by Henry St. John; Every Inch a Scot by Allan Blair; Out of Bounds by Herbert Maxwell; Britain At Bay by John Tregellis.
Notes: The young woman has rowed thirty miles to find help. The Belgians are going to kill her father, something Blake vows he will not allow to happen. He and his band set off for her village where they mount an attack on the Belgian forces. The battle is ferocious and, once again, we are treated to surprisingly bloody scenes. Amid the slaughter, Major van Bruggen makes his escape.
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ See issue 313 for review notes.
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. 6 Issue 313 · 4/5/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO (Part 20)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Unknown
Notes: The final instalment of the series. Blake learns that a cargo ship has been docked nearby and filled with rubber for delivery to Belgium. He and Shumpogaas sneak aboard and begin dousing the vessel with oil. They fire the ship but are then captured by van Bruggen who vows to hang them at dawn. Fortunately, a Belgian officer arrives and recognises the Major as the criminal who had, many years ago, swindled him of his fortune. He frees Blake and arrests van Bruggen who tries to escape only to be stabbed to death by the young woman whose father had been threatened. Blake and Shumpogaas are allowed to leave. Returning to Tinker, Pedro, Shumpogaas and Saadani, they head north on their journey out of the Congo. How the detective makes his way back to England is told in ACROSS THE EQUATOR (reviewed here).
Serial rating: ★★★★★☆ One of Sexton Blake's great serials, SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO is packed with thrills and many astonishingly bloodthirsty scenes of battle. The plot is sprawling and far too reliant on truly absurd coincidences but, nevertheless, it holds up thanks to a strong vein of absolute truth. Many of the incidents are based on events which really occurred, shocking the world. This story was probably one of the many elements which swayed public opinion, causing an outcry that ultimately led to reforms in the Congo a year after its publication. For the modern reader, the atrocities described still resonate, causing many an uneasy twinge. Above all, though, this is a great adventure filled with interesting and likable characters. Shumpogaas, in particular, stands out and is much-missed once the last page is turned (fortunately he returns in later adventures; see SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY First series no.130 AFRICAN GOLD (1920).
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. ? Issue 321 · 29/6/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
ACROSS THE EQUATOR (Part 1)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. ? Issue 322 · 6/7/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
ACROSS THE EQUATOR (Part 2)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. ? Issue 323 · 13/7/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
ACROSS THE EQUATOR (Part 3)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. ? Issue 324 · 20/7/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
ACROSS THE EQUATOR (Part 4)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. ? Issue 325 · 27/7/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
ACROSS THE EQUATOR (Part 5)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. ? Issue 326 · 3/8/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
ACROSS THE EQUATOR (Part 6)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. ? Issue 327 · 10/8/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
ACROSS THE EQUATOR (Part 7)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. ? Issue 328 · 17/8/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
ACROSS THE EQUATOR (Part 8)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. ? Issue 329 · 24/8/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
ACROSS THE EQUATOR (Part 9)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. ? Issue 330 · 31/8/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
ACROSS THE EQUATOR (Part 10)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. ? Issue 331 · 7/9/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
ACROSS THE EQUATOR (Part 11)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. ? Issue 332 · 14/9/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
ACROSS THE EQUATOR (Part 12)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. ? Issue 333 · 21/9/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
ACROSS THE EQUATOR (Part 13)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' FRIEND · New series · Vol. ? Issue 334 · 28/9/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
ACROSS THE EQUATOR (Part 14)
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present
Unrated
SEXTON BLAKE'S HONOUR THE BOYS' FRIEND LIBRARY · Issue 10 · 23/2/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 3d
SEXTON BLAKE'S HONOUR
by Anon. (Norman Goddard) · Illustrator: H. M. Lewis
Other content: None
Notes: This is one of the most important stories published about Sexton Blake as it gives us some insight into his background and family history. It begins when Will Spearing of Scotland Yard asks the detective to help investigate a recent proliferation of counterfeit money. The trail leads Blake to an illegal gambling den run by Prince Larinski, a man he finds strangely familiar. On two occasions his attempts to penetrate Larinski's organisation are foiled and both times he is saved from death by his foe. Finally, the detective manages to back his quarry into a corner and, at that point, Larinski removes his disguise to reveal himself as Sexton's older brother, Henry Blake. Shocked, the detective struggles with his feelings. Finally, he vows to reform his sibling. But Henry flees to Monaco with Blake and Spearing hot on his tail. Blake repeatedly foils Spearing's attempts to capture his brother until, in Paris, he can keep his secret no longer and reveals the truth. Spearing, while sympathetic, nevertheless has to do his duty and arrest the swindler. He and Blake agree that, henceforth, they will each attempt to get to Henry Blake first, one to offer him a new life abroad, the other to charge him with criminal offences. The detective repeatedly outwits the Yard man but Spearing's dogged pursuit never lets up and he eventually catches up with the Blake brothers on the River Thames as they try to flee out to sea. Henry performs one last gallant act before sacrificing himself to protect Sexton's honour; he throws himself overboard and is presumed drowned.
Trivia: Sexton Blake seems blunt to the point of rudeness, which would be understandable later in the story but, in fact, he's that way right from the start. This sneering personality is far less pleasant than the Blake we meet in the hands of other authors. The plot of this story was re-hashed (replacing Henry Blake with Nigel Blake) in DETECTIVE WEEKLY issue 1 as SEXTON BLAKE'S SECRET (1933).
Rating: ★★★★★☆ This is essential reading for any Sexton Blake fan; it may not be an outstanding story but it is an important one and thus earns a four-star rating.
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' FRIEND LIBRARY · Issue 27 · Oct. 1907 · Amalgamated Press · 3d
A WOOLWICH ARSENAL MYSTERY
by Anon. (E. J. Gannon) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: None
Notes: I own a copy of this issue but its cover is missing.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol 5 Issue 212 · 10/8/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 1)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: This serial was reprinted in an abridged form in THE BOYS' FRIEND LIBRARY issue 72 (1909).
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol 5 Issue 213 · 17/8/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 2)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol 5 Issue 214 · 24/8/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 3)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol 5 Issue 215 · 31/8/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 4)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol 5 Issue 216 · 7/9/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 5)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
THE COSTER KING THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol 5 Issue 217 · 14/9/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 6)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Your Editor's Advice (ed.); The Terror of the Remove by David Goodwin; The Iron Hand by Maxwell Scott; Rogues of the River by Allan Blair; Camp and Caravan by Henry St. John; Despised by the School by Andrew Gray.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol 5 Issue 218 · 21/9/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 7)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol 5 Issue 219 · 28/9/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 8)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol 5 Issue 220 · 5/10/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 9)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol 5 Issue 221 · 12/10/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 10)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol 5 Issue 222 · 19/10/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 11)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
THE COSTER KING THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol. 5 Issue 223 · 26/10/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 12)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Your Editor's Advice (ed.); The Terror of the Remove by David Goodwin; The Cliveden Combine by Charles Hamilton; A Boy O' Bristol by George Manville Fenn; The Iron Hand by Maxwell Scott.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
THE COSTER KING THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol 5 Issue 224 · 2/11/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 13)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Your Editor's Advice (ed.); The Terror of the Remove by David Goodwin; The Fourth Form Football Club by Charles Hamilton; A Boy O' Bristol by George Manville Fenn; The Iron Hand by Maxwell Scott.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
THE COSTER KING THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol. 5 Issue 225 · 9/11/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 14)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Your Editor's Advice (ed.); The Terror of the Remove by David Goodwin; A Boy O' Bristol by George Manville Fenn; The Clivedon Hobby Club by Charles Hamilton; The Iron Hand by Maxwell Scott.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
THE COSTER KING THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol. 5 Issue 226 · 16/11/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 15)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Your Editor's Advice (ed.); The Terror of the Remove by David Goodwin; A Boy O' Bristol by George Manville Fenn; A Fight for the Fifth by Charles Hamilton; The Iron Hand by Maxwell Scott.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
THE COSTER KING THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol. 5 Issue 227 · 23/11/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 16)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: J.R.B.?
Other content: Your Editor's Advice (ed.); The King of the Caravans by Sidney Drew; How Larry and Bliss Spent Christmas by Martin Shaw; The Great Railway Strike by Ambross Earle; The Terror of the Remove by David Goodwin; Our Workshop Corner (and other articles); A Boy O' Bristol by George Manville Fenn; Christmas at Clivedon by Charles Hamilton; The Iron Hand by Maxwell Scott.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
THE COSTER KING THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol. 5 Issue 228 · 30/11/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 17)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Your Editor's Advice (ed.); The King of the Caravans by Sidney Drew; The Terror of the Remove by David Goodwin; A Boy O' Bristol by George Manville Fenn; The Captain of Cliveden by Charles Hamilton; The Iron Hand by Maxwell Scott.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
THE COSTER KING THE BOYS' HERALD · Issue Vol. 5 229 · 7/12/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 18)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Your Editor's Advice (ed.); The King of the Caravans by Sidney Drew; The Terror of the Remove by David Goodwin; The Cliveden Paper-chase by Anon.; A Boy O' Bristol by George Manville Fenn; The Iron Hand by Maxwell Scott.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol. 5 Issue 230 · 14/12/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 19)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Your Editor's Advice (ed.); The King of the Caravans by Sidney Drew; The Terror of the Remove by David Goodwin; The Fourth Form Reformers by Charles Hamilton; A Boy O' Bristol by George Manville Fenn; The Iron Hand by Maxwell Scott.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
THE COSTER KING THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol. 5 Issue 231 · 21/12/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 20)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Your Editor's Advice (ed.); The King of the Caravans by Sidney Drew; The Terror of the Remove by David Goodwin; A Boy O' Bristol by George Manville Fenn; The Fourth Form Match by Unknown; The Iron Hand by Maxwell Scott.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' HERALD · Vol. 5 Issue 232 · 28/12/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE COSTER KING (part 21)
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' REALM · Vol. 5 · Issue 240 · 5/1/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
ADVENTURES OF SEXTON BLAKE: THE SHADOW
by William Murray Graydon · Illustrator: Harry Lane
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE BOYS' REALM · Issue 266 · Date unknown · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE MAN FROM SCOTLAND YARD
by Anon. (Unknown) · Illustrator: Harry Lane
Other content: Unknown
Notes: I have this story but it's just a loose page and only carries the issue number. The date, at this stage, is pure speculation. This story should not be confused with UNION JACK issue 222, as although it shares the same title, it's a totally different tale.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE CHICAGO DAILY TRIBUNE · 8/12/1907 · Price unknown
THE PRINCESS AND THE ANARCHIST
by Theodore F. Kramer · Illustrator: Young
Other content: Unknown
Notes: While out fishing, Blake spots a known Russian anarchist named Ourosoff and realises that he intends to bomb the car of a visiting princess who's on her way to Windsor. He attempts to stop the crime but is captured and tied to a time bomb. Escaping, he encounters an acquaintance who's out driving. Joining forces, they purposely run into the princess's car, thus delaying her. Ourosoff and his two compatriots are foiled by the princess not being at the right spot at the right time, and are then rounded up by the detective.
Rating: ★★☆☆☆☆
NO COVER AS YET THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Issue 428 · 10/8/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE; DETECTIVE. NO.1 — MISSING!
by Anon. (Unknown) · Illustrator: Harry Lane
Other content: Unknown
Notes: This, the first of the many short Sexton Blake tales to feature in PENNY PICTORIAL, begins with the following statement: "FOREWORD: Sexton Blake, the famous detective, having been ordered to rest by his doctors, had temporarily forsaken Baker Street, and was living during the period of these episodes in a quiet little house at Surbiton, amusing himself by flower culture, the cottage having been lent to him by an old friend, a Mr. Dove, a retired official from Scotland Yard, who was absent on the Continent." The aforementioned Mr. Dove, was featured in a story in the issue preceeding this one. It was entitled THE MAN FROM SCOTLAND YARD (not to be confused with the Sexton Blake tale of the same name, which introduced Plummer). Its author was Cecil Hayter, which suggests that these initial Pictorial stories may also have been written by him ... though their style suggests otherwise. Certainly, though, after the first seven tales, Hayter becomes the regular author of the Pictorial adventures.
A young lady, Miss Darrell, visits Sexton Blake and explains that Jack Arnely, her intended, vanished last Monday, as did £10,000 from the firm that employed him. A fragment of wax in his desk suggests that he made a copy of the key to the strong room. He had also been the last person to leave the office that day. After the interview, the detective searches Arnely's flat and discovers a roughly made key. The next day he calls on the owners of the firm, Mr Boscobel and his son, at their workplace. They try the key in the strong room lock and it fits. A sudden disturbance caused by a drunken visitor in the outer office distracts the Boscobels and Blake uses the diversion to scan through the paperwork on the younger man's desk. He finds suggestive evidence. The detective is now pretty certain that the key was planted in Arnely's flat. He departs and, outside, meets the drunken fellow who, now suddenly sober, is actually Tinker. That evening, the detective and Miss Darrell follow young Boscobel as he drives out to a secluded farm. There they overhear him encouraging a colleague in crime to murder Arnely, whom they have held captive. Blake bursts in, gun in hand, and apprehends the two villains. Arnely is rescued.
Trivia: Tinker makes an exceedingly rare appearance in the PENNY PICTORIAL. Blake instructs him to "Keep your eye on things at Baker Street."
Rating: ★★☆☆☆☆
MARK X THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Vol.XXXIII Issue 429 · 17/8/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE; DETECTIVE. NO.2 — MARK X
by Anon. (Unknown) · Illustrator: Harry Lane
Other content: Unknown
Notes: Sexton Blake receives a telegram requesting his urgent presence at Wardor Court in Essex where a murder has been done. Forsaking his convalescence, the detective travels to the country mansion and is greeted by a man named George Rawdon and a woman named Inez Chase. Rawdon explains that his uncle — Captain Sir Henry Rawdon — had been shot in the garden the day before. Everything seems to point to Rawdon's cousin, Frank, as the guilty party and the police are currently searching for him. Miss Chase is the murdered man's ward and she is in love with Frank — but it's a match the old man had thoroughly dissapproved of due to Frank's junior rank in the navy. Sir Henry believed that his nephew should concentrate on furthering his career before marrying. The two men had argued the night before the shooting and, shortly after the shot was fired, Frank had been seen fleeing from the grounds on a motorbike. His revolver, which he used for target practice each morning, was found in his room with one chamber empty after having been fired. Rawdon leaves Blake to question the girl. She tells him that Frank was seen rushing from the house because he is racing to get a marriage licence from London in defiance of his uncle's wishes. But the detective senses that Miss Chase is concealing something. She admits that she had seen Frank walking with his uncle shortly before the murder. Things look bleak for the suspected man ... until Blake spots a German pamphlet in the library. It details an experimental design for a bullet — and this puts Blake on the trail of the real killer ... ...
Trivia: Blake's doctor has 'forbidden him to smoke'. Strangely, although this is number two in the series, at the end of the tale there's a line advertising the fourth story, which it entitles AT BAY!, due to appear 'next Friday'. In fact, the third, not fourth, installment appeared the following Friday and neither it nor the fourth story (or any other!) had that title. The cover illustration for this issue — "Put me on to Scotland Yard QUICK!! — is a prototype of the iconic cover of DETECTIVE WEEKLY issue 1 (1933).
Rating: ★★★☆☆☆
NO COVER AS YET THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Issue 430 · 24/8/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE; DETECTIVE. NO.3 — THE TRIANGLE
by Anon. (Unknown) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: The cottage in Aston Villa where Sexton Blake is living is being watched. His assistant sends him a wire to inform him that the Baker Street premises is also under scrutiny. The watchers are employed by three kidnappers and blackmailers — a gang known as 'The Triangle'. That night, the house is gradually surrounded and the detective realises that an attempt is to be made on his life. When Lady Marsborough turns up on the doorstep this is confirmed — she has found a note dropped on the floor at a masked ball... an order, written by The Triangle, that night Blake must die. The society woman insists on remaining in the house to help Blake keep watch. Later, the telephone rings. The detective answers it but with tongs and a wrapped tablecloth. He holds the receiver away from himself but is nevertheless blown across the room when a massive shock comes through the line — his enemies have connected it to the nearby electric tram lines! Blake waits in the darkness, knowing that one of The Triangle will come to check that he is dead. Sure enough a man breaks in — and is revealed to by Lady Marsborough's ex-husband! Caught red-handed, the villain bites into a poisoned cigar and dies.
Trivia: Blake's move to Aston Villa, it is stated, is partially due to a need to lie low and put The Triangle off its guard. This is one of the few PENNY PICTORIAL tales which actually mentions Tinker by name.
Rating: ★★★☆☆☆
MARS II THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Vol.XXXIV Issue 431 · 31/8/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE; DETECTIVE. NO.4 — MARS II
by Anon. (Unknown) · Illustrator: R. J. MacDonald
Other content: Unknown
Notes: Continuing his pursuit of The Triangle, Sexton Blake begins to suspect that the Hon. E. C. Etherington is the second member of the criminal gang. Realising that — because she betrayed the criminal's colleague — Lady Marsborough is in danger, Blake attends a hot air balloon race in which Etherington is taking part with Lady Marsborough as his passenger. The detective believes he will attempt to throw her out of the balloon's basket. The race begins and Blake follows the Mars II, Etherington's balloon, in another. He keeps pace with his enemy through a storm and is finally able to save the intended victim. The criminal falls and breaks both his legs before taking poison to prevent his capture.
Rating: ★★★★☆☆
NO COVER AS YET THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Issue 432 · 7/9/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE; DETECTIVE. NO.5 — BLACKMAIL
by Anon. (Unknown) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: Mr James Wisden is an inventor whose new design for an aeroplane will, he hopes, win a flying competition; the first prize being £10,000. When he shows Sexton Blake the blueprints, the detective notices subtle signs which indicate that the documents have recently been affixed to the wall. Since Wisden didn't do this himself, it suggests that someone else must have done so in order to photograph the plans. Later, he goes on a shopping trip with Miss Villiers, Wisden's niece. That night, Blake observes shadowy figures crossing the garden towards the entrance to the cellars. He follows, enters the pitch black cellars and suddenly finds himself held at gunpoint by Miss Villiers and Geoffrey Wisden, the inventor's son. They intend to blackmail James Villiers until he drops his objection to their marriage. In the cellar is the photographic equipment with which the young woman will develop her photographs of the blueprints. However, she soon finds that rather than photographs of the plans, her camera seems to be filled with snapshots of herself on the shopping trip! Blake had predicted her scheme and foiled it. Since the would-be blackmailers aren't exactly hardened criminals, the detective has words with James Wisden and clears the way for their marriage.
Rating: ★★★☆☆☆
NO COVER AS YET THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Issue 433 · 14/9/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE; DETECTIVE. NO.6 — THE DORSET JEWELS
by Anon. (Unknown) · Illustrator: L. Shields
Other content: Unknown
Notes: Sexton Blake receives a letter accusing him of stealing jewels from the Duke of Dorset. The writers — Ixe & Co. — demand five thousand pounds in compensation, as they themselves had planned to rob the Duke. The detective sets up a meeting with Ixe & Co. and finds himself confronted by a small syndicate of thieves. They claim that while they were watching the Duke's residence they saw Blake enter and make off with the gems. Blake escapes when the gang becomes violent and sets the police on to them. He then returns, in disguise, to his cottage in Aston Villa where he finds that his gardener, Jenkins, is impersonating him. Jenkins is preparing to leave the country with the jewels. Blake follows him and, when the gardener is attacked by one of the syndicate, steps in to make his arrest.
Rating: ★★★★☆☆
THE MISSING PICTURE THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Vol.XXXIV Issue 434 · 21/9/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE; DETECTIVE. NO.7 — THE MISSING PICTURE
by Anon. (Unknown) · Illustrator: L. Shields
Other content: Unknown
Notes: Blake is called to Medway House after it's burgled. Only a valuable Gainsborough painting was stolen and there are no signs of a forced entry. This is the ninth robbery of this type in the past four months. Lord Medway bets Blake two thousand pounds to the detective's five hundred that he cannot solve the crime. Blake accepts the wager. Figuring that the thief would have to stand on something to reach the top of the picture's frame, the detective discovers heel marks on a couple of items of furniture and establishes that the crook was undoubtedly a woman. The following day, disguised as an out of work butler, he applies to an agency — run by a Mr East — for work and is appointed to Lady Grassdale's house. Blake realises that all her servants — appointed by East — plus Lady Grassdale herself, form the gang which has committed the spate of burglaries. Furthermore, they have pierced his disguise and intend to get rid of him. A few days into his employment, one of his fellow servants tries to slip him a sleeping draught and, during the night, gas is pumped into his room. Blake escapes by shinning down a rope but he is heard by Lady Grassdale who summons the servants. The gang leaves the house with the stolen picture hidden in a roll of linoleum. Blake pursues them to Dover by car, shooting the tyre of his quarry's vehicle. They crash and East is killed. Blake wins his bet.
Rating: ★★★★☆☆
NO COVER AS YET THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Issue 435 · 28/9/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE PRETTY PRINCESS
by Anon. (Cecil Hayter) · Illustrator: Harry Lane and R. J. MacDonald
Other content: Unknown
Notes: While out fishing in the countryside near Staines, Sexton Blake encounters Ourosoff, a notorious Russian Anarchist. He connects his presence in the region with a visit by Princess Constantine to the Royal Family at Windsor. Blake follows the Russian but is captured and bound hand and foot. Ourosoff reveals that he intends to kill the Princess with a bomb which he'll throw into her car as it passes. He then leaves the detective in a gypsy caravan attached to a booby trap: a candle which, when burned down, will set off an explosive. Blake manages to free himself and races to intercept the Princess's car. On the way he meets with an acquaintance, a keen driver named Matthieson. Commandeering driver and car, he speeds to cut off the Princess before she reaches the junction where Ourosoff intends to murder her. A purposeful but light road accident puts paid to the Royal car and her Her Highness is forced to continue her journey in Matthieson's vehicle which isn't recognised by Ourosoff. Matthieson and Blake take the woman's damaged car and travel to where the Russian lies in wait. They leap upon him, breaking his arm, and capture him. Later, they are both given an award by the Princess's father.
Trivia: With this one the numbering stops, though the overall story arc of Blake recuperating in Surbiton continues.
Rating: ★★★★☆☆
THE TRUNK MYSTERY THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Vol. XXXIV · Issue 436 · 5/10/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE TRUNK MYSTERY
by Anon. (Cecil Hayter) · Illustrator: Harry Lane
Other content: The Recollections of a Journalist by F. Scudamore; 20th Century Outlaws (article); The Witch Doctor by G. Stanley Ellis; Football Clubs with Strange Histories (article); As a Thief in the Night (article); A Girl in the Case by Anon.; The Truth About Coal (article); Woman's Paradise by Henry Farmer; Murderland (article); A Ground to Let by Anon.
Notes: A police official named Harrison calls Sexton Blake about a crime; in the flat of an elderly couple named Renshaw, the dismembered body of their lodger — a Miss Oldham — has been found. Miss Oldham had been reasonably well-off, in contrast to the Renshaws who are gamblers. This had caused much friction and Miss Oldham had threatened to remove the Renshaws from her will. Shortly before vanishing, she had asked the servant, Janet Rich, to sign a document. The servant had not seen its contents. Later, this same servant was told to take a day off by the Renshaws. When she returned, she found the ashes of a burned document in the fireplace and the Renshaws acting suspiciously. Miss Oldham had gone. Subsequent to her body being discovered, her will was read and it handed her fortune over to the Renshaws. However, the police discover a later will, the one signed by Janet Rich, which writes them out and, instead, bequeaths the money to William Renshaw — Mr Renshaw's younger brother and Miss Oldham's ex-lover. Although the case against the Renshaws seems clear cut, Blake's knowledge of inks casts a different light on affairs and exposes the real killer.
Rating: ★★★★☆☆
THE SPY THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Vol. XXXIV · Issue 437 · 12/10/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE SPY
by Anon. (Cecil Hayter) · Illustrator: Harry Lane
Other content: The Red Light by Walter Hudson; For Auld Lang Syne by A. S. Hardy; Our New Dominion by Edwin Middleton; Gold-Mine Football Crowds by Linesman; The Spike by Bart Kennedy; A Disasterous Speculation by Vincent Yorke; The Recollections of a Journalist by F. Scudamore; Woman's Paradise by Henry Farmer; Murderland (article); Quits by Madge Smith.
Notes: Sexton Blake is approached by Colonel Madison on a matter of national importance. Madison is in charge of an engineering unit that has been working on a new design of airship. Army Intelligence has informed him that a man in Berlin — named Lefarge — has a photograph of the secret ship in his possession and is offering to sell the plans to a foreign power. Blake has heard of Lefarge; he is an international spy and has been responsible for a number of murders. Madison takes the detective to Ming Court, an isolated estate where the balloon is being developed. Here, Madison is approached by one of his officers and asked to return the keys to the safe in which the blueprints are stored ... but Madison insists that he never borrowed the keys. Then it is reported that the keys have been returned within the last five minutes ... by Madison! Blake realises that spies have access to the base and an intruder, disguised as the Colonel, is present. That night, as recommended by Blake, the airship is given a test flight. It is watched by a spy who, in turn, is observed by the detective. Afterwards, Blake and Madison lie in wait near the safe. When intruders enter through a secret passage, they find themselves caught red-handed and are shot during the ensuing struggle.
Rating: ★★★★☆☆
THE SAFE-BREAKER THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Vol. XXXIV · Issue 438 · 19/10/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE SAFE-BREAKER
by Anon. (Cecil Hayter) · Illustrator: Harry Lane
Other content: The Red Light by Walter Hudson; Within the Ropes (article); A Woman's Trick by Charles D. Leslie; The Recollections of a Journalist by F. Scudamore; Weighed Down with Honours (article); The King's Highway by Bart Kennedy; When East Comes West by G. C. Curnock; In Sickness and in Health by Allan Blair; 20th Century Outlaws (article); Woman's Paradise by Henry Farmer; Murderland (article); Quits by Madge Smith.
Notes: A less-than-entirely-honest diamond dealer named Levison consults Sexton Blake after a series of robberies in which jewels were mysteriously removed from his safe without any apparent signs of a break-in. Having a large shipment of gemstones due, Levison, who has since purchased a new safe, is worried that they will also be stolen. Blake spends the night in the jeweller's shop and catches the cracksman at work ... except it isn't a man but Levison's pretty young typist! She holds him at bay with a pistol and explains that she is the daughter of a man who lost his sanity after being ruthlessly cheated by the jeweller. She intends to rob Levison of £20,000 — equal to the sum he stole from her father. Blake agrees that she is justified in acting beyond the boundaries of the law. He allows her to finish the job and go free.
Trivia: It is stated that Blake wants a new motor car (and £500 will pay for it!).
Rating: ★☆☆☆☆☆
WITHIN AN ACE THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Vol. XXXIV · Issue 439 · 26/10/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
WITHIN AN ACE
by Anon. (Cecil Hayter) · Illustrator: L. S. Shields
Other content: The Red Light by Walter Hudson; Hey Presto (article); The King's Highway by Bart Kennedy; Out of the Mist by Michael Storm; 20th Century Outlaws (article); The Victory of John Cort by Allan Blair; A Revolution in Billiards by Linesman; Woman's Paradise by Henry Farmer; The Recollections of a Journalist by F. Scudamore; Murderland (article); Bob Hickson's Benefit by Anon.
Notes: Blake is visited by his friend Sir Ralph Sanderson, who tells him that, shortly after his recent marriage, his half-brother—Robert—turned up, installed himself in the house, has refused to leave, and has made three attempts to kill his sibling. What Sanderson can’t understand is the motive, for even if he dies, his half-brother wouldn’t inherit the estate. Blake goes with Sanderson back to the house where he is introduced as a guest. There, he notices Robert receiving a letter from a firm of solicitors that were once mixed up with a gang of moneylenders and discovers that his friend’s life is insured by them. If Sir Ralph dies, Robert will receive a large payout. When the next murder attempt is made, Blake is lying in wait. He and Sir Ralph catch the villain in the act, brutally beat him with riding crops, and he is banished from the home and country.
Rating: ★★☆☆☆☆ The punishment meted out by Blake at the end of this story seems rather harsh and out of character.
NO COVER AS YET THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Issue 440 · 2/11/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE TRAGEDY OF NO. 9 HOLE
by Anon. (Cecil Hayter) · Illustrator: R. J. MacDonald
Other content: Unknown
Notes: While playing golf, Blake is among a group that witnesses a disagreement between two young men, both being suitors for Molly Maxwell. When one of the two is discovered murdered beside number 9 hole, all the evidence suggests that the other killed him. Blake has to cut through the web cast by the clues in order to ensure that an innocent man avoids the noose. He does so, the vital factor being the brand of a certain golf ball.
Rating: ★★☆☆☆☆
NO COVER AS YET THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Issue 441 · 9/11/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE BANISHED PRINCESS AND HER DAUGHTER
by Anon. (Cecil Hayter) · Illustrator: R. J. MacDonald
Other content: Unknown
Notes: Blake decodes a message he finds in the “personals” section of a newspaper and realises that an attempt will be made to kidnap the daughter of a foreign princess. The princess, divorced from her brutal husband, is currently hiding out in a farmhouse on the Yorkshire Moors. The detective races to her rescue and fights off three men, killing one and wounding another, though the third, Morton gets away. Blake receives a bullet through his shoulder.
Rating: ★★☆☆☆☆
NO COVER AS YET THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Issue 442 · 16/11/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE LAST OF THE RED TRIANGLE
by Anon. (Cecil Hayter) · Illustrator: R. J. MacDonald and L. S. Shields
Other content: Unknown
Notes: Still hiding out in Surbiton, Sexton Blake is increasingly aware that the sole surviving member of The Triangle (see THE TRIANGLE and MARS II), whoever that might be, is bent on killing him. The detective sets out to identify the villain, his first clues being a series of threatening letters. The subsequent trail, which consists of the unique tiny faults in the lettering of specific typewriters, leads to Major Preston, at whose apartment Blake leaves his own threatening note. The inevitable confrontation follows, the two men holding each other at gunpoint. Preston shoots Blake in the shoulder but himself receives a fatal bullet.
Trivia: This is the last of the Surbiton tales. It was reprinted as a supplemental story in SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY 2nd series issue 230 under the title A FIGHT TO THE DEATH. Blake's "young assistant" isn't referred to by name. Blake was also shot in the shoulder in the previous issue.
Rating: ★★★★☆☆
NO COVER AS YET THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Issue 443 · 23/11/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE CASE OF LORD RICHARD MANSBRIDGE
by Anon. (Cecil Hayter) · Illustrator: R. J. MacDonald
Other content: Unknown
Notes: Blake moves into a house in Messenger Square, Chelsea, seeking peace, quiet and solitude but is soon interrupted by the arrival of Miss Viola Royne who wants him to find her missing fiancé, Lord Richard Mansbridge, who has disappeared from a train. The detective visits Mansbridge's home and, from evidence given by his servant, Anderson, deduces that the man who boarded the train was an impostor. Mansbridge has been kidnapped and is being held prisoner. Blake works out where, and he and Anderson rush to an isolated house and there find the captive being tortured by three men and a woman who are demanding that he makes a large part of his fortune available to them. The crooks are overpowered and Mansbridge is set free.
Trivia: There appears to be no good reason for Blake's move to Messenger Square. He remains there for the rest of the Penny Pictorial tales.
Rating: ★★☆☆☆☆
NO COVER AS YET THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Issue 444 · 30/11/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE FERNHAM ROAD MYSTERY
by Anon. (Cecil Hayter) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: Sexton Blake is visited by an acquaintance, a young lawyer named Oliver, who finds the detective has been neglecting himself while obsessing over chemical research. Taking him to dinner, Oliver tells him about the murder of a model named Mary Duncan who was found with her throat cut in her flat on Fernham Road. A few doors down lives a man named Jack Lane. Circumstantial evidence suggests that he and Mary had gone for a meal together, had argued violently, and he had then killed her. Oliver, though, believes that Lane is innocent. Blake agrees to look into the case and interviews Lane before proceeding to the murder scene. After inspecting it, he tears apart the police case and identifies the real killer.
Trivia: Messenger Square, off the King’s Road, Chelsea, consists of eighteen houses which, due to a legal case, are untenanted bar the one in which Sexton Blake is resident. The detective ‘had few friends in those days, and lived a life of almost complete solitude.’ Those few acquaintances he has signal their arrival by a secret knock at the door — all other knocks are ignored.
Rating: ★★☆☆☆☆
NO COVER AS YET THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Issue 445 · 7/12/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE KING'S MESSENGER
by Anon. (Cecil Hayter) · Illustrator: R. J. MacDonald
Other content: Unknown
Notes: A King’s Messenger named Acton Poulett visits Sexton Blake after having been followed for the past two days. He’s on a mission to deliver an urgent letter to the Kaiser and wants to throw his pursuers off the track by carrying a dummy letter while Blake delivers the real one. The detective agrees to this and 48 hours later he hands the document to the Kaiser in Berlin. Upon his return to England, Blake finds that Poulett has been murdered and his body dumped in Marston Wood in Surrey. Visiting the crime scene, he discovers a ring which his subsequent investigations reveal was made in Vienna. Next, he visits Prince zu Krastenburg at a residence in London. The Prince, it turns out, is a spy, the owner of the ring, and the murderer of Poulett. He reacts to his exposure in the only way his career allows: by putting a bullet through his own head.
Trivia: Sexton Blake periodically sits in his armchair and does absolutely nothing but stare blank-eyed at the ceiling. Sometimes this lasts for twenty-four hours. Other times it can go on for up to a week. During these ‘rest cures’ he doesn’t sleep. His house, in Messenger Square, is totally unfurnished apart from two armchairs, a desk and a bed. Blake belongs to The Gentleman’s Gentlemen’s Club where he is known as Mr. Banks.
Rating: ★★★★☆☆
NO COVER AS YET THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Issue 446 · 14/12/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE MAFIA
by Anon. (Cecil Hayter) · Illustrator: R. J. MacDonald
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Issue 447 · 21/12/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE WEIRD ADVENTURE OF "LADY ANNE"
by Anon. (Cecil Hayter) · Illustrator: R. J. MacDonald
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET THE PENNY PICTORIAL · Issue 448 · 28/12/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE CLAIRVOYANT
by Anon. (Cecil Hayter) · Illustrator: R. J. MacDonald
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
A FOOTBALL MYSTERY UNION JACK · New series · Vol. 7 Issue 169 · 5/1/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
A FOOTBALL MYSTERY
by Anon. (W. J. Lomax) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: The Hidden City by Beverley Kent.
Notes: Sir James Collier has mysteriously disappeared from his bedroom after an evening spent entertaining guests. He was due to play football for Derby against the Crimson Ramblers, a team touring from abroad and comprised of Americans, French and Germans. Without him in the squad, Derby lost 8-0; a win for the Rambers' which means that, in a month, they'll play against England. The Ramblers' principle strikers — Courcy, Blitzen and Eclair — had been among Sir James' guests, so Blake decides to investigate them and the rest of the team. He and Tinker travel to Nottingham to watch a match. After it (a 10-0 drubbing for Nottingham), Blake spies on the team manager, Raymond, and comes to the conclusion that some kind of scam is underway, though how it works he cannot fathom. Later, Tinker's nosiness gets him into trouble. He is kidnapped by Raymond, Courcy, Blitzen and Eclair and taken to an abandoned mine. Lowered into a shaft, he finds himself in the company of a fellow kidnap victim: Sir James. The two of them, over a period of three days, explore the mine in the hope of finding a way out, nearly dying of thirst in the process. Blake, meanwhile, having discovered that Tinker is missing, believes that Raymond may have killed him. Breaking into the manager's hotel room, he discovers the secret of the rambler's winning streak. However, he is caught red-handed by the footballers and soon finds himself being lowered into the mineshaft too. By this time, though, Tinker and Sir James have escaped and they rescue the detective. Knowing the secret of the Ramblers' success, Blake now seeks to reproduce it. For days, he sweats in a workshop on Sir James' estate while the latter, with Tinker, practices soccer and conducts secret negotiations with the Football Association. Finally, Blake is ready and, when the match between the Crimson Ramblers and England begins, the crowd is astonished to see that three unknowns are in the home side squad. They are even more amazed when these three (who are, of course, Blake Tinker and Sir James) lead England to an incredible 30-0 victory! The Ramblers are exposed as cheats and, having been required to return the fortune in gate money that they've made, they are kicked out of the country.
Trivia Sexton Blake's landlady has a son in this story. The question is: is the landlady Mrs Bardell? She's not mentioned by name.
Rating: ★★★★★★ This is a marvellously written story with some truly laugh-out-loud passages of dialogue. When Blake questions a barman who incessantly brings the conversation back to the local cow which swallowed something that disagreed with it, it's impossible to keep the giggles at bay. The climax, with Blake and Tinker playing for England, is tremendous and enough to rouse a cheer from even the most critical of readers. Furthermore, the author was decades ahead of Nike! All in all, this one is simply delightful.
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Vol. 7 Issue 170 · 12/1/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE CASE OF THE RIVAL DETECTIVES
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: H. M. Lewis
Other content: The Hidden City by Beverley Kent.
Notes: My copy is missing the cover. Denis Ashley engages a special train to race to his ill father's bedside. He offers a lift to a man named Charters and his daughter. As the locomotive leaves the platform, a man races after it but Charters refuses to let Denis stop the train and the young man is thrown from the carriage. He is met by the pursuer, an American detective named Fenlock Fawn, who reveals that Charters is a well-known American crook, real name Brand Mallard. Fawn telegraphs ahead to Scotland Yard and Sergeant Carrow is dispatched to shadow Mallard from Waterloo Station. Carrow bumps into Sexton Blake, who correctly predicts that the criminal and his daughter will have abandoned the train before its arrival. He also theorises that Fawn has been lured into a trap. He races to the other detective's rescue and saves him from being gassed. As Mallard escapes, he knocks down Sergeant Carrow then shoots him in the leg, possibly crippling him for life. Blake vows that the American crook will serve a long sentence in Dartmoor for this. Fawn, though, wants him extradited to America where, in return for giving information about high profile crime operations, he will be offered a light sentence. The two detectives agree to work in competition. Mallard, by this time, has reached a country house prepared for him by his two confederates, Shirley Canfield and Wendel Vickers. Their plotting is overheard by Mallard's adopted daughter, Hazel, who now realises that her guardian caused her father's death. Mallard keeps her a prisoner for a week before she escapes and runs into Tinker, who, with Sexton Blake, is searching the area. The pair then encounter Denis Ashley, who lives in the neighbourhood. The three crooks catch up with Hazel and a fight breaks out, during which Canfield is shot in the shoulder. Denis is overpowered and Hazel is recaptured but Tinker makes a getaway and reports back to his guv'nor. With the help of Pedro, Blake identifies the crook's house. He then discovers that Fenlock Fawn is also on the trail and in the area. The two detective raid the house but accidentally confound each other's efforts, allowing the villains to escape. They do, however, find and rescue the imprisoned Denis Ashley. Blake keeps track of Fawn's progress and learns that his rival is back on Mallard's trail, having moved into a town house next to the one now occupied by the villain. However, before Blake can make a move, Wendel Vickers does: breaking into the detective's Baker Street home and attacking him. Tinker knocks the crook unconscious and Blake, disguised as Vickers, heads for Mallard's house. Tinker follows Fawn, who enters Mallard's place via the skylight. The youngster soon finds himself fighting to liberate Hazel, while Fawn battles with Mallard. Blake joins the fray but it is Fawn who captures the criminal, escorting him to a yacht on the Thames, ready to sail to America. Blake, though, is not beaten. With the assistance of Detective-Inspector Widgeon, he intercepts the yacht and arrests Mallard. Fawn accepts defeat.
Trivia: Tinker seems quite young in this story and is referred to as a 'boy' more than once. He experiences an intense affection for Hazel, complete with jealousy and heartfelt sighs. This reminds Sexton Blake of his own youth and he recalls an unnamed woman whom he had loved. We also learn that Blake drives a Mors car during this period.
Rating: ★★☆☆☆☆
THE SLAVE MARKET UNION JACK · New series · Vol. 7 Issue 171 · 19/1/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE SLAVE MARKET
by Anon. (Cecil Hayter) · Illustrator: Fred Bennett
Other content: The Hidden City by Beverley Kent.
Notes: Sexton Blake and Tinker are in Africa on a mission to rescue Sir Richard Losely, Governor of Musardu and the Bambarra hinterlands, from a slaver named the White Death. While on reconnaissance around the slaver's camp, Tinker is captured. Blake establishes contact with an African warrior named Lobangu who, though working for the slaver, is sympathetic to the white man and determined to kill the White Death. The two of them sneak into the camp in the guise of buyers and create the illusion that a British taskforce is attacking. The diversion is successful and Sir Richard, Tinker, Lobangu and Blake make their getaway during the confusion. A thrilling canoe chase and gunfight ensues until the fugitives reach safety. Learning that the White Death intends to travel into unknown territory where a dwarf tribe, the Marani, guards mountains veined with priceless rubies, Blake determines to reach the territory first to set a trap. Lobangu lays a trail, to give the impression that they are fleeing, in the hope that the villains will waste time following the diversion. The group then begins a fast march to the distant mountains, allying themselves with friendly tribesmen along the way. Upon reaching the rocky heights, Blake and Losely parley with the Marani and have soon gathered a small army. They set an ambush for the White Death and attack his safari as it enters a rocky gorge. Soon all the slaver's men are dead and only he remains. Sir Richard challenges him to one-to-one combat. They fight with scimitars and the White Death is killed. This story was reprinted in an abridged version in THE BOYS' FRIEND LIBRARY issue 246 (1913).
Trivia: Sir Richard Losely is married and has a young son named Leonard. Losely is a huge 6' 4" character, possibly inspired by Sir Richard Francis Burton via Rider Haggard. Though he is a few years older than Blake, they were at school together at St. Ermin's, where Losely had been nicknamed 'Spots' and Blake 'Blackamoor'.
Rating: ★★★★★★ A tightly writtem, action-packed adventure of the first order. This one has everything; thrills, spills and laughs, excellent characters and a brilliantly realised African setting. What's more, it introduces two favourite recurring characters: Sir Richard Losely and Lobangu. Marvellous! Incidentally, Fred Bennett's illustrations for this issue are among the best he ever produced for the Blake saga.
THE LAIRD OF DURRISDEER UNION JACK · New series · Vol. 7 Issue 172 · 26/1/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE LAIRD OF DURRISDEER
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: R. T. MacDonald
Other content: The Hidden City by Beverley Kent.
Notes: My copy is missing the cover. This was reprinted in PENNY POPULAR issue 8 as THE LOST LAIRD (1912).
Unrated
SEXTON BLAKE M.P. UNION JACK · New series · Vol. 7 Issue 173 · 2/2/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE M.P.
by Anon. (E. J. Gannon) · Illustrator: E. E. Briscoe
Other content: The Hidden City by Beverley Kent.
Notes: My copy is missing the cover.
Unrated
THE DOCTOR DETECTIVE UNION JACK · New series · Vol. 7 Issue 174 · 9/2/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE DOCTOR DETECTIVE
by Anon. (Norman Goddard) · Illustrator: Harry Lane
Other content: The Hidden City by Beverley Kent.
Notes: This was reprinted in PENNY POPULAR issue 9 as A DASH FOR FREEDOM (1912).
Unrated
SEXTON BLAKE, SHOPWALKER UNION JACK · New series · Vol. 7 Issue 175 · 16/2/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE, SHOPWALKER
by Anon. (W. J. Lomax) · Illustrator: H. M. Lewis
Other content: The Hidden City by Beverley Kent.
Notes: My copy is missing the cover.
Unrated
SEXTON BLAKE IN JAMAICA UNION JACK · New series · Vol. 7 Issue 176 · 23/2/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN JAMAICA
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: H. M. Lewis
Other content: The Hidden City by Beverley Kent.
Notes: The story is inspired by the earthquake which took place in Jamaica this year. It begins at a plantation on that island and tells of Desmond Berenger's marriage; of the kidnapping of his only child and the death of his wife; of his discovery that his cousin, Hedley Sherston, was responsible; and of their subsequent confrontation during which Sherston confesses that the boy is dead after being lost at sea. Desmond, distraught and suffering from a fever, dies ... but not before making a will leaving his fortune to his faithful servant, Black Tom, and entrusting him with a letter proving Sherston's guilt. Years later, Tom arrives in Baker Street seeking Sexton Blake's help (he says Blake was recommended by his friend Kalulu, who we met in SEXTON BLAKE IN THE CONGO in BOYS' FRIEND issues 294 to 313). Tom reveals that before he could hand the will and letter to the authorities, Sherston's overseer, Mark Legrand, sold him into slavery on the island of Hayti while Sherston himself inherited his cousin's property. After three years, Tom escaped back to Jamaica but couldn't find where he'd hidden the documents. Blake takes on the case and sails to Jamaica where he, Tinker and Tom begin to search for a house with a crack in its wall; the place where Tom had concealed the paperwork. Pretty soon, the detective falls into the clutches of the villains and, bound and gagged, he's abandoned in a hut in the middle of the 'Yellow Swamp'. Tinker sets out on a rescue mission, narrowly avoiding a hungry alligator, but is soon caught too. Tom and Pedro come to the rescue and soon they are all back searching for the lost letter. Eventually, they find the house... at exactly the same time as Sherston and Legrand. Meanwhile, in Kingston, a young sailor, Dick Carter, is having an uncomfortable conversation with his superior, Captain Reynolds. Carter loves Reynold's daughter, Mabel, but he is penniless and adopted, in conrast to Mabel who is the heiress to a fortune, and the Captain disapproves of their relationship. Before the problem can be resolved, Jamaica is hit by a massive earthquake. At the house, Legrand and Sherston are killed by falling masonry. Tinker finds the lost documents in the rubble then our heroes set off to help the emergency services in Kingston. During the rescue efforts, they are joined by Dick Carter, who Tom immediately recognises as the lost son of Desmond Berenger. Dick inherits the fortune, marries Mabel, and Tom is restored to his position as faithful family retainer (which is alll he ever wanted anyway).
Rating: ★★★★☆☆ If you can forgive the appalling characterisations of black Jamaicans (and you should, because it was typical of the time when this story was written), this is quite a satisfying tale. Black Tom is lovable and tremendously courageous, giving the story much pathos.
SALVATION ARMY BLAKE UNION JACK · New series · Issue 177 · 2/3/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SALVATION ARMY BLAKE
by Anon. (Norman Goddard) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: The Hidden City by Beverley Kent.
Notes: This was reprinted in PENNY POPULAR issue 31 as SEXTON BLAKE'S MISSION (1913).
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 178 · 9/3/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
STRUCK OFF THE ROLLS; OR, SEXTON BLAKE IN CORSICA
by Anon. (E. J. Gannon) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.
Notes: My copy is missing the cover.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 179 · 16/3/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE SEAMY SIDE
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: E. E. Briscoe
Other content: The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.
Notes: My copy is missing the cover. This was reprinted in PENNY POPULAR issue 7 as THE MISSING HEIR (1912).
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 180 · 23/3/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
TINKER'S TRIUMPH
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.
Notes: My copy is missing the cover.
Unrated
SEXTON BLAKE'S ZULU UNION JACK · New series · Issue 181 · 30/3/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE'S ZULU
by Anon. (Cecil Hayter) · Illustrator: Val Reading
Other content: The Shipley Scholarship by Max Hamilton; The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.
Notes: Easter double issue. This is a sequel to THE SLAVE MARKET. It was reprinted in an abridged version in THE BOYS' FRIEND LIBRARY issue 246 (1913). Sexton Blake, Tinker and Pedro have returned to Africa to join Sir Richard Losely on a mission. But before they embark upon this, Tinker is sent to fetch Lobangu. He and the giant Zulu chieftain fight their way through hostile natives and journey back to Blake and Losely where Lobangu is informed that Losely is searching for a distant relative. This person, descended from the union of an African explorer of the Losely clan and a half African/half Arab native, stands to inherit a large English estate. Upon hearing this, Lobangu begins to act in a mysterious manner and sends Tinker to bring back wise men from a little-known tribe. Through these, proofs are gained that Lobangu is, in fact, the man Losely has been looking for. The giant Zulu becomes Lord Averstock, sixth baron of Averstock and Marne. He travels to England with his friends who have the difficult task of teaching him the manners and conventions of civilisation. After many an hilarious run-in with the various contraptions and institutions of good old Blighty, Lobangu has had enough and wants to go home. When he reveals that diamonds lie in sacred mountains near where his brother rules the Etbaia, Losely and Blake decide to accompany him. Back in Africa, they find that the diamonds are guarded by a lost tribe of Egyptians who have mastery over natural sources of electricity. They manage to defeat these cruel and corrupt guardians of the treasure and lay claim to the fortune. This ensures the security and prosperity of the Etbaia tribe.
Trivia: It has been 'many moons' since the events of THE SLAVE MARKET and during that time Blake and Tinker have been back in England. It is stated that Lobangu is 37 years of age.
Rating: ★★★★★☆
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 182 · 6/4/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
BLACKMAIL!
by Anon. (W. J. Lomax) · Illustrator: H. M. Lewis
Other content: The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.
Notes: My copy is missing the cover.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 183 · 13/4/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN WALES
by Anon. (Cecily Hamilton) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 184 · 20/4/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
IN THE HANDS OF THE MONEYLENDERS
by Anon. (Norman Goddard) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Unknown
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
THE REMITTANCE MAN UNION JACK · New series · Issue 185 · 27/4/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE REMITTANCE MAN
by Anon. (E. J. Gannon) · Illustrator: Fred Bennett
Other content: The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.
Notes: This was reprinted in PENNY POPULAR issue 32 as THE PRODIGAL'S PRIDE (1913).
Unrated
THE TICKET-OF-LEAVE MAN UNION JACK · New series · Issue 186 · 4/5/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE "TICKET-OF-LEAVE" MAN
by Anon. (W. J. Lomax) · Illustrator: Harry Lane
Other content: The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
THE EMPTY HOUSE UNION JACK · New series · Issue 187 · 11/5/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE EMPTY HOUSE
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.
Notes: This was reprinted in PENNY POPULAR issue 36 as THE MISSING TREATY (1913).
Unrated
SEXTON BLAKE IN IRELAND UNION JACK · New series · Issue 188 · 18/5/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN IRELAND
by Anon. (E. J. Gannon) · Illustrator: Harry Lane
Other content: None
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
THE DOCKYARD DETECTIVE UNION JACK · New series · Issue 189 · 25/5/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE DOCKYARD DETECTIVE
by Anon. (Edgar Pickering) · Illustrator: R. J. Macdonald
Other content: The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
THE STOCK EXCHANGE DETECTIVE UNION JACK · New series · Issue 190 · 1/6/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE STOCK EXCHANGE DETECTIVE
by Anon. (A. C. Murray) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.
Notes: A. C. Murray is notable as the author who penned the first ever story for the NELSON LEE LIBRARY. This Blake tale was reprinted in PENNY POPULAR issue 37 as SEXTON BLAKE ON 'CHANGE (1913).
Unrated
THE STOLEN GAINSBOROUGH UNION JACK · New series · Issue 191 · 8/6/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE STOLEN GAINSBOROUGH
by Anon. (Arthur Steffens) · Illustrator: E. E. Briscoe
Other content: The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.
Notes: This was reprinted in PENNY POPULAR issue 38 as THE PICTURE STEALERS (1913).
Unrated
THE SOCIETY DETECTIVE UNION JACK · New series · Issue 192 · 15/6/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE SOCIETY DETECTIVE
by Anon. (F. H. Evans) · Illustrator: H. M. Lewis
Other content: The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
BEWARE! UNION JACK · New series · Issue 193 · 22/6/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
BEWARE!
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: H. M. Lewis
Other content: The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.
Notes: My copy is missing the cover.
Unrated
THE FIRE-WORSHIPPERS UNION JACK · New series · Issue 194 · 29/6/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE FIRE-WORSHIPPERS
by Anon. (Cecily Hamilton) · Illustrator: Harry Lane
Other content: The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.
Notes: Lionel Charlcote was born in India to a British father and Parsee mother. After his father's death, which occurred when he was a baby, his Parsee grandfather, Jamsetjee Khan, informed his mother than Richard would become the high priest of a secretive sect. The woman fled with her child and was pursued and killed, but not before she handed Lionel to British sailors, who duly delivered him to his English grandfather at Charlcote Hall in Devon. Twelve years later, Sexton Blake visits St. Audrey's school to hand out prizes. He and Tinker stay overnight, and while they are there, Lionel is kidnapped. Having learned the boy's history, Blake trails the kidnappers to Bombay. With an old acquaintance, a Hindu detective named Govind Punt, he sets off to infiltrate a meeting of the sect that is led by Jamsetjee Khan, but Punt turns out to be a disguised impostor and Blake is attacked. After successfully defending himself, he continues alone to the meeting and there hears that the boy is being held nearby in a secret temple. Unfortunately, the detective's disguise is pierced and he is captured. The real Punt comes to his rescue with Tinker and, once they’ve escaped, they make their way to the temple. They find the boy but are caught trying to liberate him and are sentenced to death. Taken to the top of a tower of silence, they are left tightly bound to suffer through the day’s burning heat before being eaten alive by vultures. Just as it appears hopeless, Punt arrives with Pedro, who chases off the birds. They free the boy but are confronted by priests. Outnumbered, all appears hopeless until Jamsetjee Khan suddenly remembers an old prophecy that says doom will come upon the sect if it is ever led by a person whose blood is not pure Parsee. Realising that Lionel can never be one of them, they set the Britishers free on condition they reveal nothing of the sect's existence.
Trivia: Tinker says, "I've not long been out of school ..." In a nice bit of cross-referencing, mention is made of Blake's recent adventures in the Congo. He is also compared with Nelson Lee. It is interesting to compare this story with 2014's THE TOWER OF SILENCE.
Rating: ★★★☆☆☆ A gripping tale but with a few juvenile moments and a terribly silly and disappointing end.
THE BROKER'S MAN UNION JACK · New series · Issue 195 · 6/7/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE BROKER'S MAN
by Anon. (Norman Goddard) · Illustrator: Harry Lane
Other content: The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.; The Iron Hand by Anon.
Notes: This was reprinted in two parts in PENNY POPULAR issue 34 as THE MAN IN POSSESSION and PENNY POPULAR issue 35 as THE LONG LANE MYSTERY (1913).
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 196 · 13/7/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE MESMERIST DETECTIVE
by Anon. (Norman Goddard) · Illustrator: Harry Lane
Other content: The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
THE CASE OF THE MISSING PRESIDENT UNION JACK · New series · Issue 197 · 20/7/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE CASE OF THE MISSING PRESIDENT
by Anon. (E. H. Burrage) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.
Notes: This was reprinted in PENNY POPULAR issue 40 as THE PRESIDENT DETECTIVE (1913).
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 198 · 27/7/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE, CHEAP-JACK
by Anon. (E. W. Alais) · Illustrator: E. E. Briscoe
Other content: The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 199 · 3/8/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN ASHANTI
by Anon. (W. J. Lomax) · Illustrator: H. M. Lewis
Other content: The Slapcrash Boys by Anon.; Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 200 · 10/8/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE CASE OF THE CORONER'S COURT
by Anon. (E. J. Gannon) · Illustrator: H. M. Lewis
MISSING!
by Anon. (Unknown) · Illustrator: None
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: Parts of this were reprinted (or rewritten?) in PENNY POPULAR issue 82 as IN DEEP WATERS and in PENNY POPULAR issue 83 as AN INTERNATIONAL AFFAIR (1914). The short story — MISSING! — is the same as the first of the PENNY PICTORIAL stories and was printed here to attract Blake fans to that publication.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 201 · 17/8/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE SLEEPING SICKNESS
by Anon. (Cecil Hayter) · Illustrator: Fred Bennet
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: Sexton Blake, Tinker and Pedro are enjoying a holiday in Africa with Sir Richard Losely and Lobangu. After liberating an Arab slave trader's captives, they learn that a white man — who they are able to identify as an explorer named Edgar Mainwaring — is being held captive and tortured by a mysterious tribe not far from their current location. Mainwaring had come to Africa to research beri-beri, the sleeping sickness, but seems to have stumbled upon a plot that threatens Great Britain. The adventurers mount a rescue mission and trek through a massive forest in which they are attacked by pygmies and almost killed by a cyclone. They also acquire an additional travelling companion — a chimpanzee which Tinker names Jemima. Clues lead them to an island on a large lake but, upon arrival, they drink from a spring and immediately fall into a drugged sleep. Blake awakens to find that he, Tinker and Losely are prisoners of a Chinaman named Li Yen, the head of a small tribe of masked villains. Li Yen has been experimenting on Mainwaring and has perfected a potent form of ber-beri which he intends to release into Britain's reservoirs. The detective manages to overpower his guards, gain some rifles and barracade himself and his friends in part of the enemy base but when Li Yen released infected flies into the captured rooms the Englishmen have to battle the sleeping sickness. Soon only Blake is left standing. Lobangu, who had been overlooked by Li Yen, is able to contact Blake and learns that there's a cure for ber-beri at an oasis forty miles to the north. He runs there and back and, with help from Jemima, delivers the antidote. Recovered, Blake and his friends win the day. Li Yen commits suicide.
Trivia: My copy is missing its cover. This tale marks another occasion where Blake is ordered to rest by his doctors.
Rating: ★★★★★★
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 202 · 24/8/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE AT THE OPERA
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.; The Terror of the Remove by David Goodwin
Notes: This was reprinted in PENNY POPULAR issue 42 as STARS OF THE OPERA (1913).
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 203 · 31/8/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
BASE COIN
by Anon. (Arthur Steffens) · Illustrator: Unknown
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: My copy is missing the cover. This was reprinted in PENNY POPULAR issue 41 as COUNTERFEIT COIN (1913).
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 204 · 7/9/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE STOLEN MUMMY
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: H. M. Lewis
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 205 · 14/9/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE IN AMSTERDAM
by Anon. (Cecily Hamilton) · Illustrator: H. M. Lewis
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: This was reprinted in PENNY POPULAR issue 43 as THE GHOST OF ASHLEIGH DENE (1913).
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 206 · 21/9/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE, WHALER
by Anon. (Cecil Hayter) · Illustrator: E. E. Briscoe
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: Some days ago, during negotiations with a tribal chief, Blake, Tinker, Pedro, Sir Richard Losely, Lobangu and a small escort of soldiers had been ambushed. A running battle was fought all the way to the coast, by which time most of the soldiers were dead. The survivors had managed to escape by boat but, after a storm broke their mast, they were set adrift. Now they are battle weary, wounded, starved and thirsty, with little hope of rescue. But it eventually comes in the form of the Mary How — a whaling ship controlled by the brutal Captain Savage. Despite their weak state, this man bullies his new passengers remorselessly, so, after they have recovered and been forced to join the crew, they begin a subtle campaign of revenge, using the contents of the medicine chest. Blake, meanwhile, proves his worth by making the ship's first catch (in fascinating scenes describing traditional whaling techniques). But in doing so he enrages his far less efficient shipmates and a massive fight breaks out which ends with Blake & co. trapped in the fo'c's'le. However, by creeping through the hold, they manage to swap positions with Savage and are soon masters of the ship. A carpenter named Jocelyn joins forces with them and, as the ship, which has sailed far north by now, approaches pack ice, they depart from it in one of the whaling boats and head for land. Once there, they build an igloo and hunt seal for meat and skins. After some hair-raising encounters with polar bears, Blake and his friends eventually fall in with a tribe of eskimos who guide them to a friendly whaling ship. Aboard this, they head for home. En route, they find the crushed remains of the Mary How and witness its last two survivors — Captain Savage and his First Mate — kill each other in a feud over their dwindling supplies.
Trivia: For some unaccountable reason Sir Richard Losely's surname has been altered to Loseby in this issue.
Rating: ★★★★★☆ A very entertaining issue filled with extremely convincing accounts of whaling as it was done in the days before mechanisation. Perhaps rather disturbing for conservation-conscious modern readers but, nevertheless, of real historical value.
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 207 · 28/9/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE — LUMBERMAN
by Anon. (Norman Goddard) · Illustrator: Harry Lane
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: This was reprinted in PENNY POPULAR issue 45 as SEXTON BLAKE, LUMBERJACK (1913).
Unrated
SEXTON BLAKE, PRIVATE SECRETARY UNION JACK · New series · Issue 208 · 5/10/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE, PRIVATE SECRETARY
by Anon. (W. J. Lomax) · Illustrator: H. M. Lewis
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: Parts of this were reprinted (or rewritten?) in PENNY POPULAR issue 84 as A DIPLOMATIC TRIANGLE and in PENNY POPULAR issue 85 as HIGH TREASON (1914).
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 209 · 12/10/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE ON THE MOORS
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: H. M. Lewis
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 210 · 19/10/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE MYSTERY OF THE LIGHTSHIP
by Anon. (Cecily Hamilton) · Illustrator: T. T. Holmes
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: This was reprinted in PENNY POPULAR issue 44 as CHECKMATED (1913).
Unrated
SEXTON BLAKE, INSURANCE DETECTIVE UNION JACK · New series · Issue 211 · 26/10/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE CATTLE MYSTERY
by Anon. (Norman Goddard) · Illustrator: Harry Lane
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: This was reprinted in PENNY POPULAR issue 39 as COUNT NAVANI'S COUP (1913).
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 212 · 2/11/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE STAG AT BAY
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: E. E. Briscoe
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 213 · 9/11/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE CARDSHARPER
by Anon. (W. J. Lomax) · Illustrator: H. M. Lewis
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: This was reprinted in PENNY POPULAR issue 46 as THE MASTER CHEAT (1913).
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 214 · 16/11/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE ON DEVIL'S ISLAND
by Anon. (Arthur Steffens) · Illustrator: Fred Bennett
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: Parts of this were reprinted (or rewritten?) in PENNY POPULAR issue 86 as TRANSPORTED FOR LIFE and PENNY POPULAR issue 87 as A STRUGGLE FOR LIBERTY (both 1914).
Unrated
SEXTON BLAKE, INSURANCE DETECTIVE UNION JACK · Vol. 9 New series · Issue 215 · 23/11/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE — INSURANCE DETECTIVE
by Anon. (E. J. Gannon) · Illustrator: E. E. Briscoe
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: The Workmen's Compensation Act (passed in 1897) was extensively amended in 1906 to allow workers to claim compensation for any injuries suffered at their place of employment. Inspired by contemporary events, this story begins when Sexton Blake is called upon to investigate a massive insurance swindle. Thousands of fraudulent claims are being made and it seems the scam is organised. Blake's dogged detective work leads to Lord Percival Desperre but, before he can pursue this any further, Tinker is kidnapped and Blake is warned to cease his investigations or his assistant's life will be forfeit. The detective retaliates by kidnapping Lord Desperre and posting an ad in the papers warning that whatever treatment Tinker suffers at the villains' hands will be meeted out, in return, to his prisoner. It works; Tinker is freed and Desperre is let loose. Blake is now convinced that the swindlers are among the aristocracy, so he and Tinker begin to move among upper class society. Spotting their suspects, they trail them to the Isle of Wight where they finally encounter the architect of the swindle: the beautiful Countess Zelia. The otherwise innocent Desperre has fallen under this woman's spell, finding himself, against his better judgement, involved in the crime. When she flees to her yacht, Desperre and Tinker meet each other at her house where they find evidence of her villainy. The young aristocrat realises that he has been fooled. Blake, meanwhile, is captured, taken out on a stormy sea and thrown overboard. Tinker, following in a tug boat, mounts a heroic rescue. As the storm worsens, the yacht flounders and her crew abandon ship leaving the Countess to her fate. Blake saves her and discovers that she's actually a European Princess who, after being betrayed, has fallen on hard times.
Rating: ★★★☆☆☆ After a slow start, this one builds to a dramatic climax which just about prevents it from being instantly forgettable. For the social historian, it reveals an interesting attitude towards aristocracy. The implication is that even when the upper classes "go off the rails," they do so for a good reason and can win redemption through their inherent "better nature."
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 216 · 30/11/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE FOREIGN LEGION
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: H. M. Lewis
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 217 · 7/12/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE SLATE CLUB SCANDAL
by Anon. (Norman Goddard) · Illustrator: Harry Lane
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: Rather bizarrely, this story was split up and reprinted as three separate tales in PENNY POPULAR. Chapters 9 to 13 were revised in PENNY POPULAR issue 49 as AT GRIPS WITH THE LAW; chapters 1, 2, 14, 15, 16 and 23 were revised in PENNY POPULAR issue 63 as SEXTON BLAKE'S RESOLVE; chapters 17 to 22 were revised for PENNY POPULAR issue 64 as THE SLATE CLUB SWINDLER (all 1913); and chapters 3 to 8 were revised for PENNY POPULAR issue 65 GAMBLING WITH FATE (1914).
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 218 · 14/12/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
BY ROYAL COMMAND
by Anon. (William Murray Graydon) · Illustrator: H. M. Lewis
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.
Notes: This was reprinted in PENNY POPULAR issue 47 as BY THE KING'S COMMAND (1913).
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 219 · 21/12/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
THE CASE OF THE LOST HUSBAND
by Anon. (W. J. Lomax) · Illustrator: Fred Holmes
Other content: Ching-Ching at School by Anon.; Thirty Years in Siberia by V. S. Ephremoff
Notes: None at present.
Unrated
NO COVER AS YET UNION JACK · New series · Issue 220 · 28/12/1907 · Amalgamated Press · 1d
SEXTON BLAKE — CHEMIST
by Anon. (Cecily Hamilton) · Illustrator: T. W. Holmes
Other content: Ching-Ching Abroad by Anon.
Notes: Parts of this were reprinted (or rewritten?) in PENNY POPULAR issue 48 as THE WILMINGHAM GANG (1913) and PENNY POPULAR issue 69 as SEXTON BLAKE'S STRANGE QUEST (1914).
Unrated



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